Home Map E-mail
 
Eng |  Հայ |  Türk |   Рус  |  Fr  

Home
Main
About AGMI
Mission statement
Director's message
Contacts
Pre-Genocide Armenia
History of Armenia
Pre-Genocide photos
Intellectuals
Armenian Genocide
What is Genocide
Armenian Genocide
Chronology
Photos of Armenian Genocide
100 photographic stories
Mapping Armenian Genocide
Cultural Genocide
Remember
Documents
American
British
German
Russian
French
Austrian
Turkish

Research
Bibliography
Survivors Stories
Eye-Witnesses
Media
Quotations
Public Lectures
Recognition
States
International organizations
Provincial governments
Public petitions
AGMI Events
Delegations
Museum G-Brief
News
Conferences
Links
   Museum
Museum Info
Plan a visit
Permanent exhibition
Temporary exhibition
Online exhibition  
Traveling exhibitions  
Memorial postcards  
   Institute
Goals & Endeavors
Publications
AGMI Journals  
Library
AGMI collection
   Tsitsernakaberd Complex
Description and History
Memory alley
Remembrance day
 

Armenian General Benevolent Union
All Armenian Fund
Armenian News Agency
armin
armin
armin
armin
armin




Museum G-Brief

Anti-Defamation League Denies the Armenian Genocide while Israeli Knesset debate the Issue

by Benyamin Poghosyan
Armenian Genocide Museum &Institute (AGMI)

16.04.2008

International recognition of the Armenian Genocide continues despite several obstacles and drawbacks. Some organizations deny the fact of Genocide or play down the horrible events by calling them “mass killings” or “atrocities”.

Surprisingly, one such scenario took place with the Anti-defamation League (ADL). A Jewish organization, established in the USA, denied Armenian Genocide through the statements of its National Director, Abraham H. Foxman. Naturally, US based Armenian organizations, firstly the Armenian National Committee of America (ANCA) heavily criticized this blatent denial. The Watertown Town Council in Massachusetts unanimously voted on Tuesday, August 14 2007, to rescind its affiliation with the “No Place for Hate” anti-racism and tolerance promotion program sponsored by the ADL. (Watertown has a hight ethnic Armenian population, author’s note).

ANCEM chairperson Sharistan Melkonian stated that: “The Armenian National Committee of Eastern Massachusetts applauds the Town Council for stating clearly and unequivocally that there is no place for Armenian Genocide denial in Watertown.” She went on to say “We hope that this action will prompt the ADL and its National Director Abe Foxman to rethink their profoundly immoral policies on this issue, properly recognize the Armenian Genocide, and put an end their efforts to prevent its reaffirmation by Congress.”

On August 17 Abraham Foxman sent a letter to the Jewish newspaper “Forward” trying to soothe the situation. He mentioned that the ADL has «fully acknowledged – and never denied – the massacres of hundreds of thousands of Armenians at the hands of the Ottoman Empire in 1915 through 1918. The ADL believes that the Turkish government must do more than it has to confront its history and to seek reconciliation with the Armenian people. Yet the ADL also believes that legislative efforts outside of Turkey are counterproductive to the goal of having Turkey itself come to grips with its past. We therefore have taken no position on what action Congress should take on House Resolution 106” (which recognized the Armenian Genocide).

Despite these efforts, Foxman failed to thwart the widespread criticism toward the ADL both from the Armenian and Jewish community. He was forced to make another statement on August 21st disclaiming that the ADL has decided to revisit the tragedy that befell the Armenians. “We have never negated but have always described the painful events of 1915-1918 perpetrated by the Ottoman Empire against the Armenians as massacres and atrocities. On reflection, we have come to share the view of Henry Morgenthau, Sr. that the consequences of those actions were indeed tantamount to genocide. If the word genocide had existed then, they would have called it genocide.” said Foxman.

This statement prompted tough reaction from Turkish officials. Turkey’s foreign minister (incumbent President) Abdullah Gul, complained bitterly to Israel’s ambassador in Ankara, Pinhas Avivi, that Israel could have done more to prevent the ADL’s shift. Nabi Sensoy, Turkey’s ambassador to the United States, told the Forward newspaper that Turkey was “very disappointed” by the ADL’s statement “because it changed the premise of everything we had achieved with the U.S. Jewish community.” The ADL itself tried to calm tensions by issuing a statement opposing a congressional resolution recognizing that a genocide took place and by sending a letter to Turkish Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan expressing “deep regret” and the desire to “deepen our friendship.”

The controversy regarding ADL approach toward the Armenian Genocide issue once again approved that Israeli-Turkish relations and the official position of Israel play a decisive role in definig Jewish organizations’ stance toward the recognition of the Armenian Genocide. In the last few weeks, steps have been take to promote the Genocide recognition in the Israeli Knesset. The Armenian diaspora in Israel and Israeli based Armenian organizations had a long recorded the efforts of trying to include this issue in Israeli Knesset but they always met with tough resistance from the Israeli government which used its influence to thwart these attempts. But, on March 26th, 2008, Israel’s Knesset arrived at a decision to discuss the Armenian Genocide issue. As reported by the Hay Dat Jerusalem office; the issue is likely to be considered by the Parliamentary Committee on Education. On March 14, 2007, the initiative was taken by member of Knesset Khaim Auron, the brother of Jerusalem University professor Yair Auron specializing in the Armenian Genocide issue. The motion was supported by all 11 deputies attending the session.

On April 8th, 2008, the Jewish community of Armenia issued an address to the Knesset calling for the recognition of the Armenian Genocide. The statement noted: “Discussion of the Armenian Genocide issue in the Knesset is an important move in a country whose citizens survived the Holocaust and still suffer from terror.”


FOLLOW US



DONATE

DonateforAGMI
TO KEEP THE MEMORY OF THE ARMENIAN GENOCIDE ALIVE

Special Projects Implemented by the Armenian Genocide Museum-Institute Foundation

COPYRIGHT

DonateforAGMI

TESTIMONIAL OF ARMENIAN GENOCIDE SURVIVORS

Testimonial
THE AGMI COLLECTION OF UNPUBLISHED MEMOIRS

ONLINE EXHIBITION

Temporary exhibition
SELF-DEFENSE IN CILICIA DURING THE ARMENIAN GENOCIDE

DEDICATED TO THE CENTENNIAL OF THE SELF-DEFENSE BATTLES OF MARASH, HADJIN, AINTAB

LEMKIN SCHOLARSHIP

Lemkin
AGMI ANNOUNCES 2020
LEMKIN SCHOLARSHIP FOR FOREIGN STUDENTS

TRANSFER YOUR MEMORY

100photo
Share your family story, Transfer your memory to generations.
On the eve of April 24, the Armenian Genocide Museum-Institute undertakes an initiative “transfer your memory”.

«1915» Project

1915
The seven commemorative medals dedicated to the Armenian Genocide depict the massacres of the Armenians, the roads of exile, the Armenian intelligentsia and the plundered temples.
“AGMI” foundation
8/8 Tsitsernakaberd highway
0028, Yerevan, RA
Tel.: (+374 10) 39 09 81
    2007-2021 © The Armenian Genocide Museum-Institute     E-mail: info@genocide-museum.am