Home Map E-mail
 
Eng |  Հայ |  Türk |   Рус  |  Fr  

Home
Main
About AGMI
Mission statement
Director's message
Contacts
Pre-Genocide Armenia
History of Armenia
Pre-Genocide photos
Intellectuals
Armenian Genocide
What is Genocide
Armenian Genocide
Chronology
Photos of Armenian Genocide
100 photographic stories
Mapping Armenian Genocide
Cultural Genocide
Remember
Documents
American
British
German
Russian
French
Austrian
Turkish

Research
Bibliography
Survivors Stories
Eye-Witnesses
Media
Quotations
Public Lectures
Recognition
States
International organizations
Provincial governments
Public petitions
AGMI Events
Delegations
Museum G-Brief
News
Conferences
Links
   Museum
Museum Info
Plan a visit
Permanent exhibition
Temporary exhibition
Online exhibition  
Traveling exhibitions  
Memorial postcards  
   Institute
Goals & Endeavors
Publications
AGMI Journals  
Library
AGMI collection
   Tsitsernakaberd Complex
Description and History
Memory alley
Remembrance day
 

Armenian General Benevolent Union
All Armenian Fund
Armenian News Agency
armin
armin
armin
armin
armin




News

Einar af Wirsén - 75



“I still remember the scabrous expression on Talat’s face,
when he said that the Armenian issue was resolved”

Einar af Wirsén was born in 1875, in Uppsala, Sweden. He received his higher military education at the Royal Military Academy of Sweden. In 1900-1902, he has entered the Swedish Royal Army Staff College. In 1903, he has received the degree of attachment and continued his education. During 1910-1914 he has served in the General Staff. In August 1915, he was sent to the Ottoman Empire for diplomatic service. As a military attaché to the Swedish embassy, he remained in the empire until 1920, first in Constantinople, then in Sofia. As a diplomatic representative of a neutral country, Wirsén had the opportunity to travel through the empire during the war, to go to the front, to meet Turkish-German military and political figures. Wirsén’s information on the Armenian Genocide is based on the diplomat’s personal observations, German-Turkish military intelligence, as well as unofficial testimonies provided by German military personnel in the Ottoman Empire. Wirsén’s first telegrams to the Stockholm General Staff about the Armenian Genocide date back to February 1916. The attaché emphasizes that the deportation of Armenians is not the result of the governmental miscalculation or inability to control the situation, but is aimed at their destruction. Wirsén speaks of the unfriendly attitude of Turkish circles towards him due to a booklet in 1919 on the Balkans, in which he spoke negatively about the political order.

Wirsén spoke in detail about the history of the Armenian Genocide in his memoir of the war “Memories of War and Peace” (Minnen från fred och krig), which was published in Stockholm, in 1942. The chapter of the book entitled “Murder of a Nation” is entirely dedicated to the organized nature of the extermination of Armenians in the Ottoman Empire, the methods of murder: “The displaced were often classified into groups; Men were kept separate from women and children. Men were being killed in masse, young women were sent to Turkish harems. Children were left to starve, as was the case in several states. The children were tied up to each other in hundred groups thrown on rafts, and drowned in the Euphrates”. He also states that the destruction orders were issued secretly and orally. According to Wirsén, about one million Armenians were killed in the empire as a result of government measures.

During 1920-1940, Einar af Wirsén continued his diplomatic service in various countries. His work within the circle of League of Nations was an important episode in his career. In 1924-1925, Wirsén has been appointed as a member of the League of Nations Commission of Inquiry into Mosul. His report had a decisive role in the decision of the Council of the League of handing over Mosul to Iraq. Wirsén died in January 1946, in Sweden.







Regina Galustyan
AGMI applicant, researcher





1. Einar af Wirsén, Minnen från fred och Krig (Stockholm: A. Bonnier, 1942).
2. Vahagn Avedian, “Knowing and Doing: the Armenian Genocide in Official Swedish Reports” in In Times of Genocide 1915-2015: Report from a Conference on the Armenian Genocide and Syriac Seyfo, ed. Lars Hillås Lingius (Stockholm: Bilda Förlag, 2015), pp. 71-83.






FOLLOW US



DONATE

DonateforAGMI
TO KEEP THE MEMORY OF THE ARMENIAN GENOCIDE ALIVE

Special Projects Implemented by the Armenian Genocide Museum-Institute Foundation

COPYRIGHT

DonateforAGMI

TESTIMONIAL OF ARMENIAN GENOCIDE SURVIVORS

Testimonial
THE AGMI COLLECTION OF UNPUBLISHED MEMOIRS

ONLINE EXHIBITION

Temporary exhibition
SELF-DEFENSE IN CILICIA DURING THE ARMENIAN GENOCIDE

DEDICATED TO THE CENTENNIAL OF THE SELF-DEFENSE BATTLES OF MARASH, HADJIN, AINTAB

LEMKIN SCHOLARSHIP

Lemkin
AGMI ANNOUNCES 2020
LEMKIN SCHOLARSHIP FOR FOREIGN STUDENTS

TRANSFER YOUR MEMORY

100photo
Share your family story, Transfer your memory to generations.
On the eve of April 24, the Armenian Genocide Museum-Institute undertakes an initiative “transfer your memory”.

«1915» Project

1915
The seven commemorative medals dedicated to the Armenian Genocide depict the massacres of the Armenians, the roads of exile, the Armenian intelligentsia and the plundered temples.
“AGMI” foundation
8/8 Tsitsernakaberd highway
0028, Yerevan, RA
Tel.: (+374 10) 39 09 81
    2007-2020 © The Armenian Genocide Museum-Institute     E-mail: info@genocide-museum.am